March is National Women’s History Month

2015 National Women’s History Month Honorees

Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives

2015 is the National Women’s History Project’s  35th Anniversary.  In celebration of this landmark anniversary, there were 9 women chosen as 2015 Honorees who have contributed in very special ways to our work of “writing women back into history.”  I would like to focus on one person in particular.

Darlene Clark Hine (1947- ) Historian and Educator

Darlene-with-book-2-150x150                                 1

Receiving the 2013 National Humanities Medal… was both a blessing
and a profound moment in the history of Black Women’s History
because it represented acknowledgement and appreciation
of the work that I and my generation of scholars did to include
the contributions that black women have made to our nation’s
progress and to the global struggle against social injustice,
and economic and gender inequality
.  Darlene Clark Hine

She is also, the author of Black Women in White: Racial Conflict and Cooperation in the Nursing Profession, 1890-1950 (Blacks in the Diaspora) Paperback – October 1, 1989 . This is the book I referenced last month  during my webinar title, African American Nurses: Past, Present & Future with Senator Rosalyn Dance.

Go to www.nicolembrownrn.com for REPLAY!!!

As an historian Darlene Clark Hine sought not only to explore African American history, but to expand the discipline of history itself by focusing on black women “who remained at the very bottom of the ladder in the United States.” A leading expert on the subject of race, class, and gender in American society, Hine is credited with helping to establish a doctoral field in Comparative Black History at Michigan State University.

While attending Chicago’s Roosevelt University in the sixties, Hine says it was “hearing black activists refer so often to history, seeing the black culture celebrated by artists, and reading new works by black writers  “that inspired her with the hope that someday she could change the very definition of “history.”

“Historians can write a history of anything or anyone,” Hine is quoted as saying, “but apparently few considered black women worth the telling.” Hine herself had to be persuaded to explore the lives of African American women in Indiana, but soon became convinced that US history was leaving out far too much that was important to nurture a comprehensive understanding of American society. Thus her preliminary research on women’s roles in churches, and other settings led to brief monograph, When the Truth Is Told: Black Women’s Community and Culture in Indiana, 1875-1950 (1980).

“If I can…impress upon the historical profession” she once insisted, “how important it is to talk to and illuminate the lives of people who did not leave written records, but who also influenced generations of women all over the globe, then I will feel that my career is worthwhile.”

 

Reference: http://www.nwhp.org/2015-national-womens-history-month-honorees/

 

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