10 Ways to Go Red This February

Go Red For Women wants to remind you of some easy ways you can Go Red this year. What does it mean to Go Red? It means supporting women just like you as we break the barriers against heart disease and stroke. Show your support for women to increase funding, education and awareness with these ideas: 10 Ways to Go Red 1. Know Your Heart Score Learn why it’s important to know your heart score on Go Red. Think you are eating right and getting enough exercise? It takes five minutes to make sure. Take the My Life Check and find out where you stand. You can also take the Go Red Heart CheckUp to get more tailored advice and information to improve your heart health. 2. Live Healthy Learn new ways to prevent heart disease with heart-healthy recipes, exercises and more on Go Red For Women. Our team of cardiologists, medical and fitness experts and nutritionists offer their advice to women like you for living a healthy lifestyle. 3. Know the Signs of a Heart Attack Watch Go Red For Women’s “Just a Little Heart Attack” video, starring and directed by Elizabeth Banks, to learn how to identify a heart attack. Learn more about the symptoms of a heart attack and stroke on Go Red. 4. Start Walking Get moving and start walking by starting or joining a walking club with friends or coworkers with the help of the American Heart Association. Sign up, get resources and even coordinate your group online! 5. Wear Red Brighten your wardrobe and support women fighting heart disease by wearing red and...

National Nurse Anesthetists Week: 25-31

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Fact Sheet Nurse anesthetists have been providing anesthesia care to patients in the United States for more than 150 years. The credential CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist) came into existence in 1956. CRNAs are anesthesia professionals who safely administer more than 34 million anesthetics to patients each year in the United States, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) 2013 Practice Profile Survey. CRNAs are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America, enabling healthcare facilities in these medically underserved areas to offer obstetrical, surgical, pain management and trauma stabilization services. In some states, CRNAs are the sole providers in nearly 100 percent of the rural hospitals. According to a 1999 report from the Institute of Medicine, anesthesia care is nearly 50 times safer than it was in the early 1980s. Numerous outcomes studies have demonstrated that there is no difference in the quality of care provided by CRNAs and their physician counterparts. CRNAs provide anesthesia in collaboration with surgeons, anesthesiologists, dentists, podiatrists, and other qualified healthcare professionals. When anesthesia is administered by a nurse anesthetist, it is recognized as the practice of nursing; when administered by an anesthesiologist, it is recognized as the practice of medicine. Regardless of whether their educational background is in nursing or medicine, all anesthesia professionals give anesthesia the same way. As advanced practice registered nurses, CRNAs practice with a high degree of autonomy and professional respect. They carry a heavy load of responsibility and are compensated accordingly. CRNAs practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered: traditional hospital surgical suites and obstetrical delivery rooms; critical...

National Hand Washing Awareness Week is December 7th-13th

National Hand Washing Awareness Week is December 7th-13th The Power is in Your Hands In the midst of the cold and flu season, you can take control of your own well-being and help protect those who live and work around you. By practicing a few, simple handwashing behaviors, you can decrease the risk of contracting and spreading respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses – like H1N1 and the seasonal flu. Keep Germs Out Germs enter your body through direct contamination of the eyes, nose and mouth… at the hands of your own hands! Frequent handwashing is one sure way to safeguard against illness. Another way to battle germs is through flu vaccinations which help lower your reaction to viruses. Talk to your Healthcare professional about a plan to keep you and your family healthy this winter. Four Simple Steps to Stop Germs from Spreading: • Wash your hands frequently: before you eat and when they’re dirty • Do NOT cough into your hands • Do NOT sneeze into your hands • Do NOT touch your nose, eyes, or mouth with your hands – instead, use a clean tissue when touching these areas of your face Ask https://www.facebook.com/NurseNicoleMBrown today about ways you can lower your risks for getting a cold or the flu. Also, sign up to win a free book with the Nurse Nicole holiday giveaway!! Do you need information to explain hand washing to your children? For books and DVDs on how to decrease germs, check out http://www.nursneicole.co Happy Hand Washing...

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. If it’s not controlled, diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems. One in 12 Americans has diabetes – that’s more than 25 million people. And another 79 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news? People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, increasing physical activity, and losing weight. How can American Diabetes Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. Here are just a few ideas: Encourage people to make small changes, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Talk to people in your community about getting regular checkups. They can get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, and ask the doctor about their diabetes risk. Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. How can I help spread the word? -Share this post!! Share this: Facebook3 Twitter1 Pinterest Google...

Happy Nurses Week!

I think Florence would be proud to see how nursing has advanced over the many years since she opened the Nightingale School. Nursing has progressed far beyond the boundaries that were originally envisioned. Indeed, a good description of nursing today would be boundless. We have increased the educational levels found in both the academic and practical aspects of nursing. Nurse practitioners have further pushed our frontiers back in areas ranging from obstetrics to pediatrics to geriatrics. Nurses are a formidable force within the current healthcare system. Even as great as that sounds, we still have a long way to go. I think that much of nursing’s potential is still untapped. As a group that comprises over half of the healthcare workforce, nursing should be able to have a major say in the future direction of healthcare. This was part of the findings from the Institute of Medicine’s report on The Future of Nursing. This is an achievable goal, but it is not something that we can just walk in a policy meeting and lay claim to. There are certain keys that will give nurses entrance to the committees, study groups and other policy making functions that are found anywhere from the local level to national and above. The first key is formal education. If you don’t have a BSN, then get started on the road to increase your formal knowledge. Already have your BSN? Then set your sites on a MSN, MBA or other master’s level course. These initials behind your name show that you are serious about your future in this great profession. These initials show that you...

Your Heart in the Right Place?

There are so many great initiatives tied to National Heart Month. I love the diversity in audiences some of the organizations address, such as Go Red for Women and Power to End Stroke, a joint effort between the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. The resources and tools to prevent heart attacks and heart disease are almost endless. Let’s look at those tools and resources that will help you determine if your heart is healthy. Power to End Stroke Tools My Life Check Assessment Family Tree (Health) History Personal Risk Assessment Go Red for Women Tools Know Your Risk Assessments Go Red Pin, Go Red Plan (Check Home Page for Prompts) Is your heart in the right place? If not, then you would do well by you and your loved ones to (1) receive clinical assessment (2) know your family’s heart health history (3) make lifestyle changes and (4) show some love to yourself and take great care of the one thing that keeps you going – your precious...

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