Happy Veterans Day

  “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…” –President Woodrow Wilson Nov 11 1918   I am proud to be a Veteran of The United States Army. Not many people understand the discipline and self sacrifice required to serve in the military. As an educator I often ask questions to gain a better understanding of what motivates people to think the way they do. Today I decided to ask this question of random people that I encountered while running my errands “Why is it important to celebrate Veterans day?” The responses ranged from offended looks to the standard answer of “because the people that died for our freedom deserve recognition”. As a result of this experience, something very important occurred to me; many civilians that have not served in the military have no idea about the origins of Veterans Day or why we should celebrate it. Nothing to fear, Nurse educator Nicole is here. On any given day I wear a number of hats. I am a mom, daughter, sister, Nurse, educator, entrepreneur, and an Army Veteran.  Today I’m putting on my Veteran and educator hat. Answers to commonly asked Veterans day questions are listed below. Knowing these answers will make you a more informed citizen. My hope is that...

March is National Women’s History Month

2015 National Women’s History Month Honorees Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives 2015 is the National Women’s History Project’s  35th Anniversary.  In celebration of this landmark anniversary, there were 9 women chosen as 2015 Honorees who have contributed in very special ways to our work of “writing women back into history.”  I would like to focus on one person in particular. Darlene Clark Hine (1947- ) Historian and Educator                                   Receiving the 2013 National Humanities Medal… was both a blessing and a profound moment in the history of Black Women’s History because it represented acknowledgement and appreciation of the work that I and my generation of scholars did to include the contributions that black women have made to our nation’s progress and to the global struggle against social injustice, and economic and gender inequality.  Darlene Clark Hine She is also, the author of Black Women in White: Racial Conflict and Cooperation in the Nursing Profession, 1890-1950 (Blacks in the Diaspora) Paperback – October 1, 1989 . This is the book I referenced last month  during my webinar title, African American Nurses: Past, Present & Future with Senator Rosalyn Dance. Go to www.nicolembrownrn.com for REPLAY!!! As an historian Darlene Clark Hine sought not only to explore African American history, but to expand the discipline of history itself by focusing on black women “who remained at the very bottom of the ladder in the United States.” A leading expert on the subject of race, class, and gender in American society, Hine is credited with helping to establish a doctoral field in Comparative Black History at Michigan State University. While attending Chicago’s Roosevelt University in...

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