March is National Kidney Month

March has been declared as the National Kidney Month and today is a good day to know more about one of the most important organs in the body. After all kidneys work 24/7, yes even when a person is sleeping… It is important to know exactly how they function, what they do for the body, and what should be known about kidney disease. Basically, the kidneys filter 200 liters of blood daily to remove toxins, waste and water and produce urine. But do you know that the kidneys also produce a hormone which stimulates the production of red blood cells? This hormone is called Erythropoietin. The kidneys also produce hormones that help regulate blood pressure and the metabolism of calcium. Additionally, the kidneys help maintain the chemical balance of salt, potassium and acid. Even though anyone can get Chronic Kidney Disease, there are certain groups of people who are more likely to develop the disease. These would include: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asians, American Indians and Pacific Islanders. Diabetes is more common in these groups and have an inherited tendency to develop CKD. African Americans, meanwhile, have higher incidences of high blood pressure. Those who are older, have diabetes, have high blood pressure or have a family member who has chronic disease are also most likely to develop kidney diseases. Diabetes and high blood pressure are the leading causes of CKD. Diabetes damages the kidney’s filters causing protein to leak into the urine. On the other hand, HBP increases the pressure on the walls of blood vessels resulting to kidney disease, strokes and heart attacks. Diagnosis and treatment can...

10 Ways to Go Red This February

Go Red For Women wants to remind you of some easy ways you can Go Red this year. What does it mean to Go Red? It means supporting women just like you as we break the barriers against heart disease and stroke. Show your support for women to increase funding, education and awareness with these ideas: 10 Ways to Go Red 1. Know Your Heart Score Learn why it’s important to know your heart score on Go Red. Think you are eating right and getting enough exercise? It takes five minutes to make sure. Take the My Life Check and find out where you stand. You can also take the Go Red Heart CheckUp to get more tailored advice and information to improve your heart health. 2. Live Healthy Learn new ways to prevent heart disease with heart-healthy recipes, exercises and more on Go Red For Women. Our team of cardiologists, medical and fitness experts and nutritionists offer their advice to women like you for living a healthy lifestyle. 3. Know the Signs of a Heart Attack Watch Go Red For Women’s “Just a Little Heart Attack” video, starring and directed by Elizabeth Banks, to learn how to identify a heart attack. Learn more about the symptoms of a heart attack and stroke on Go Red. 4. Start Walking Get moving and start walking by starting or joining a walking club with friends or coworkers with the help of the American Heart Association. Sign up, get resources and even coordinate your group online! 5. Wear Red Brighten your wardrobe and support women fighting heart disease by wearing red and...

National Nurse Anesthetists Week: 25-31

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Fact Sheet Nurse anesthetists have been providing anesthesia care to patients in the United States for more than 150 years. The credential CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist) came into existence in 1956. CRNAs are anesthesia professionals who safely administer more than 34 million anesthetics to patients each year in the United States, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) 2013 Practice Profile Survey. CRNAs are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America, enabling healthcare facilities in these medically underserved areas to offer obstetrical, surgical, pain management and trauma stabilization services. In some states, CRNAs are the sole providers in nearly 100 percent of the rural hospitals. According to a 1999 report from the Institute of Medicine, anesthesia care is nearly 50 times safer than it was in the early 1980s. Numerous outcomes studies have demonstrated that there is no difference in the quality of care provided by CRNAs and their physician counterparts. CRNAs provide anesthesia in collaboration with surgeons, anesthesiologists, dentists, podiatrists, and other qualified healthcare professionals. When anesthesia is administered by a nurse anesthetist, it is recognized as the practice of nursing; when administered by an anesthesiologist, it is recognized as the practice of medicine. Regardless of whether their educational background is in nursing or medicine, all anesthesia professionals give anesthesia the same way. As advanced practice registered nurses, CRNAs practice with a high degree of autonomy and professional respect. They carry a heavy load of responsibility and are compensated accordingly. CRNAs practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered: traditional hospital surgical suites and obstetrical delivery rooms; critical...

What Are The 10 Rules Of The Power Of Positive Thinking?

The power of positive thinking and the top ten rules in getting it is one of the hottest topic today. This is because people are realizing that positive thinking and a positive attitude does affect life significantly. Have you heard of “The Secret” movie? It’s rapidly making it’s way around the world. Whether you see a glass as half-empty or half-full can affect the way you treat yourself. We are in control of our lives and our destiny. An idle brain, is a devils’ workshop they say. This is not a positive quote. However, using this ideology in mind, we ventured to write on positive thinking, so that something productive would be achieved of our minds. Here are the top 10 Rules to Get the Power of Positive Thinking 1) Believe – You need to believe. You can not pretend to be a positive thinker. In positive thinking, you can not fake it because there is no one to pretend to. If somebody merely believes that you are a positive thinker, how can that benefit you? The most important of the ten rules of the power of positive thinking is that you yourself should believe it. 2) Be objective – This is very important in the ten rules for the power of positive thinking. Many people tend to see their lives for their failures and thus, they lose all hope of ever attaining in their goal. Some other people, filled with false pride, tend to magnify their success and they make all the wrong decisions. 3) Surround yourself with people who have a positive attitude – When you are...

Helping Your Child Transition into September

Transitions happen every day in your child’s world and September, like no other month, is a time of transitions for your child. Starting a new grade. Getting a new teacher. Learning new classroom rules. Adding more homework. No matter what the transition, you can expect an added level of stress as your child adapts to the change. When making the transition to a new grade, your child will be challenged by more rigorous academic challenges, more social demands and more responsibility. Your child will have to follow the rules, take turns, make new friends, learn harder material and try to meet the requirements of a new teacher(s). It takes a lot of energy, focus and control to keep it together all day long at school, so most kids will be tired and you’ll see an increase in temper tantrums, whining and defiance at home. Don’t take it personally! Recognize the stress that your child is under! The best response to stress is to provide empathy and support, help the child gain a sense of control, create rituals that provide predictability and teach your child ways to de-stress. Way to Show Empathy: A.) Listen – Become an “empathic listener” by listening for feelings. o Listen for the unspoken feelings that are behind the words that are said. o Look at your child’s body language and try to gain helpful information. o Listen with your heart. o Don’t be critical. o Give your child your full attention by sitting down, looking him/her in the eye. o Try to reflect back the feeling that you believe your child is conveying. B.) Ask...

Summer Allergies

When most people think of allergy season, they think spring. And while spring time allergens cause discomfort for over 50 million people in the U. S. alone, summer can be just as debilitating for those who struggle with summer allergens. Here are four of the most common summer allergy triggers and a solution for minimizing their effect. Pollen-Just as in the spring, summer’s biggest offender is pollen. But by summer the trees are done with pollination and it is the grass and weeds that step up to take their place. Grass is the most popular ground cover and is next to impossible to avoid. There are many different kinds of grass that can cause problems including well known varieties such as Timothy, Red Top, Orchard, Blue, Bermuda, and Sweet Vernal. Weeds-Weed pollination usually begins in August and can continue through late fall into November. Ragweed is probably the most well known followed closely by Sagebrush, Pigweed, Cockle weed and numerous others. For both pollens and weeds, dry windy days are the times when the air tends to be thick with pollen. It attaches to clothes, hair and any other handy surface in hopes of finding fertile ground to begin the cycle again. Mold-Mold occurs naturally outside and can only survive if and when it finds moisture. Landscaping that allows water to stand, or areas that don’t drain naturally, and piles of leaves are all places where these spores will thrive. Mold spores enter your home constantly, there’s no keeping them out. And with the increased humidity in the summer it becomes easy for them to make a home in...

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