November: National Diabetes Month

          November is National Diabetes Month. Diabetes, often referred to by healthcare professionals as Diabetes Mellitus. Diabetes Mellitus describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either due to poor insulin production, or because the body’s cells don’t properly respond to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience frequent urination (polyuria), they will become increasingly thirsty and hungry. There are 3 types of Diabetes: Type 1 Often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, juvenile diabetes, or early-onset diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. People usually develop type 1 diabetes before their 40th year, often in early adulthood or teenage years. Patients with type 1 diabetes will need to take insulin injections for the rest of their life. They must also ensure proper blood-glucose levels with regular blood tests and following a special diet. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 1 diabetes is not as common as type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 1 are treated with regular insulin injections, as well as a special diet and exercise. Type 2 Type 2 Diabetes can be one of the most troubling forms of the disease because many times its onset is due to being overweight, physically inactive and eating the wrong foods. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are type 2. Overweight and obese people have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those with a healthy body weight. People with a lot of belly fat, or abdominal obesity, are especially at risk. Being overweight/obese causes the body to release chemicals that can destabilize...

September: National Sickle Cell Awareness Month

                                                                      What do Larenz Tate, Tiki Barber, Miles Davis, Paul Williams, Tionne ‘T- Boz’ Watkins, rapper Prodigy and Junior from the Steve Harvey Morning Show have in common? Aside from being well known African American celebrities, they also share the debilitating disease Sickle Cell Anemia. The term Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) refers to a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. People with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) have abnormal hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S or sickle hemoglobin, in their red blood cells. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. SCD is passed by genes from parents to their children. In the United States, with an estimated population of over 270 million, about 1,000 babies are born with Sickle Cell Disease each year. People who have SCD inherit two abnormal hemoglobin genes, one from each parent. There are many different forms of  SCD however, in all forms at least one of the two abnormal genes causes a person’s body to make hemoglobin S. When a person has two hemoglobin S genes, Hemoglobin SS, the disease is referred to as Sickle Cell Anemia. This is the most common and often considered the most severe kind of SCD. Sickle Cell is a life long illness. The lack of tissue oxygen can cause attacks of sudden, severe pain, called pain Crises. These pain attacks can occur without warning and a person often needs to go to the hospital for effective treatment. There are effective treatments that can reduce symptoms and prolong life. The current life expectancy for a person with SCD is 40-60 years; In 1973 it was only 14 years. Early diagnosis through blood...

The Nurse Dolls

          Hello, I have been working on this dream since 2009. A toy line focused on the most trusted profession in the world: Nursing. Each time I left for work in my white lab coat and scrubs on, my children would ask me, “Are you a doctor or a dentist?” I could not find any toys to educate my children about nursing and health topics on store shelves or online. So, I decided to start a product line with books, DVD’s and dolls to educate children about nursing. My biggest job is as a proud mother of three. I’m dedicated to providing positive images of the nursing profession for children and the world, including writing children’s books, developing animated DVD’s and a doll line focused on nursing. This is for those looking for products to provide health education and nursing role models to children. I think when too many people think nurse, getting sick or being hurt comes to mind. But, I hope to teach kids at a young age that seeing a nurse is a good thing. It means they’re getting well.           Explaining the ins and outs of nursing to my children inspired me to write my first two children’s book, N is for Nurse, and Wash Your Hands, from The Adventures of Nurse Nicole series. True to life, the book describes a mom who is a nurse explaining nursing to her three children.  In addition to books, I also created an animated DVD that explains how nurses and mom’s outsmart germs, entitled, “Battle of the Germs.”. Also, new to...

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