Nurses help with Dementia: Loss of Conceptual Willpower

Nurses and nursing students take care of patients with Dementia and Alzheimer’s everyday.  Review the chart in the picture to learn the differences between dementia and Alzheimer’s. Dementia is a decline in conceptual capacity in an individual possibly as a result of global brain trauma or some ailment that brings about memory loss. If it comes up before the age of 65 then it is termed early development dementia. The expression dementia originates from a Latin word which means insanity. It can be understood as a non-specific illness syndrome where the parts of the brain responsible for memory, verbal communication, attention and problem solving are badly damaged. Nearly six months are needed for the disease to be diagnosed and in future stages, the affected individuals might end up being at a complete loss in due course. Dementia is treatable up to a specific level but as the disease press forward the symptoms turn out to be terminal. The warning signs of the disease could be reversible and it varies according to the etiology of the disease The possibility of total liberty from the symptoms of dementia is lower than 10%. Dementia can be mixed up with the near-term syndrome, delirium in the event that thorough screening of the patient’s previous record is not carried out as the symptoms are rather comparable. Depression and psychosis can be employed for differentiating dementia and delirium. Various types of dementia are best known that differ significantly in their symptoms. The symptoms of various kinds may overlap, so medical diagnosis is performed by nuclear brain scanning approaches. Common forms of dementia include Alzheimer’s disease,...

November: National Diabetes Month

          November is National Diabetes Month. Diabetes, often referred to by healthcare professionals as Diabetes Mellitus. Diabetes Mellitus describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either due to poor insulin production, or because the body’s cells don’t properly respond to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience frequent urination (polyuria), they will become increasingly thirsty and hungry. There are 3 types of Diabetes: Type 1 Often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, juvenile diabetes, or early-onset diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. People usually develop type 1 diabetes before their 40th year, often in early adulthood or teenage years. Patients with type 1 diabetes will need to take insulin injections for the rest of their life. They must also ensure proper blood-glucose levels with regular blood tests and following a special diet. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 1 diabetes is not as common as type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 1 are treated with regular insulin injections, as well as a special diet and exercise. Type 2 Type 2 Diabetes can be one of the most troubling forms of the disease because many times its onset is due to being overweight, physically inactive and eating the wrong foods. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are type 2. Overweight and obese people have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those with a healthy body weight. People with a lot of belly fat, or abdominal obesity, are especially at risk. Being overweight/obese causes the body to release chemicals that can destabilize...

Who Takes Care of NURSES?

In grade school children are encouraged to bring an apple for their teacher as a way of saying Thank you. In Corporate America birthdays, anniversaries, and the welcoming of a new bundle of joy to an employee’s family warrant some form of celebration and gifts. Showing Thanks and celebrating one another become part of our societal norm and cultural mannerisms very early on in life. When we are treated at a medical facility, whether pre scheduled appointment or emergency, we are usually self-focused. A myriad of emotions may befall the average patient, “Is everything alright with my health”? “How much will this visit cost me?” “Is this procedure going to hurt”? What we rarely notice is the Nurse taking our vitals, gathering information, concerning over the smallest detail of our health and in the fight with us. Who cares for the one caring for all? Many Nurses cite stress and fatigue as the leading cause of burn out in the field. Multi-tasking to ensure that every patient receives the best level of care while working long arduous rotating shifts, is not for the weak. Thank God, there are Nurses and Healthcare Professionals that care for us physically and emotionally when our bodies cannot or will not care for itself. There are many ways to show appreciation for our Nurses. A little known secret; many Nurses are trinket and toy people who become excited by representations of their field. The Nurse Dolls, books and DVD make a great Christmas, Birthday, Graduation, Nurses Week, and “thinking of you” gifts! If the Nurse in your life ever uses a pen, haha, we have...

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