Feeling SAD this Holiday: Seasonal Affective Disorder, know the symptoms of SAD

      Have you ever experienced feelings of unexplained sadness and energy loss during Winter? How can you tell if these feelings are your body’s normal reaction to the elevated stress associated with the Winter holidays or something more? Everyone feels the blues sometimes, but those who with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)  experience symptoms that go far beyond general moodiness. SAD is a type of depression related to changes in seasons. SAD begins and ends at about the same times every year. If you’re like most people with SAD, your symptoms start in the fall and continue into the winter months subsiding around April or May, sapping your energy and making you feel moody. SAD affects 10 million American adults. As many as one in 10 people experience the disorder in states where the climates are colder and cloudier. Anyone can get SAD, but it’s more common in: Women. People who live far from the equator, where winter daylight hours are very short. People between the ages of 15 and 55. People who have a close relative with SAD. Experts aren’t sure what causes SAD. But they think it may be caused by a lack of sunlight. Lack of light may upset your “biological clock,” which controls your sleep-wake pattern. Lack of sunlight may also cause problems with serotonin, a brain chemical that affects mood. Some symptoms of SAD include, but are not limited to: Feel sad, grumpy, moody, or anxious. Lose interest in your usual activities. Eat more and crave carbohydrates, such as bread and pasta. Gain weight. Sleep more but still feel tired. Have trouble concentrating. There are 3 main courses...

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