Happy Veterans Day

  “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…” –President Woodrow Wilson Nov 11 1918   I am proud to be a Veteran of The United States Army. Not many people understand the discipline and self sacrifice required to serve in the military. As an educator I often ask questions to gain a better understanding of what motivates people to think the way they do. Today I decided to ask this question of random people that I encountered while running my errands “Why is it important to celebrate Veterans day?” The responses ranged from offended looks to the standard answer of “because the people that died for our freedom deserve recognition”. As a result of this experience, something very important occurred to me; many civilians that have not served in the military have no idea about the origins of Veterans Day or why we should celebrate it. Nothing to fear, Nurse educator Nicole is here. On any given day I wear a number of hats. I am a mom, daughter, sister, Nurse, educator, entrepreneur, and an Army Veteran.  Today I’m putting on my Veteran and educator hat. Answers to commonly asked Veterans day questions are listed below. Knowing these answers will make you a more informed citizen. My hope is that...

Nursing Success College Career & Education EXPO!

The Nursing Success College Expo is coming November 21, 2015 located in Richmond, VA. We have sponsors and vendors for the event, especially for nurses! This event is for RNs, LPNs, CNAs, students and future nurses!! Come one, come all!! Here is a list of benefits: FREE Parking! Classes for nurses to own their own businesses! There will be on the site interviews for nurses! Classes for nurses to acquire CEU’s! Schools of nursing with open enrollment! Vendors with information to help nurses! Books about how to become a nurses and more!! Nurse dolls, children’s books and DVD’s about nursing! Check out www.nursingsuccesscollege.com website Sign up on eventbrite! http://www.eventbrite.com/e/nursing-success-college-career-education-expo-rva-tickets-17357640169?aff=es2      ...

Too Many Nurse Jobs, Not Enough Nurses

When it comes to nursing jobs, some may say that there are not enough nurses to fill those positions. With many schools and vocational centers, there are many nurses graduating each year. However, while many graduate, there are more that simply just do not get into the schools altogether. Despite people saying that nursing jobs have been on a freeze, nursing is still said to be one of the top careers in 2011. Statistics show that there are going to be over three million jobs added by the year 2018. However, will there be enough nurses to fill these jobs? With many of the baby boomers turning sixty-five, they are eligible for Medicare and since Medicare offers better health coverage than some, this gives the need for more and more nurses and positions to care for all of the patients. In addition to the baby boomers getting over the age of sixty-five, there is also the fact that they will be retiring, making more nursing jobs open. Many are calling on advanced practice nurses to provide primary care so they can fill in the gaps left by a shortage of primary care physicians. This helps to provide more medical care where a doctor may not be available. Society needs to do everything it can to get the word out so that the increase of nurses can fill all the new jobs that are to come. In addition to more jobs opening and the need for nurses rises, comes the point of nurses wanting to go to school for nursing but not being able to afford the schooling and training....

10 African-American Nurses Who Changed the Course of History

In honor of Black History Month, this blog is dedicated to the review of the Top 10 African American Nurses Who Changed the Course of History. Nursing has come a long way over the years, and its evolution – at least politically – owes much to the exceptional service, advocacy and determination of African Americans in the profession. From the inspirational Harriet Tubman to the feisty Mary Eliza Mahoney, these 10 women stand as shining examples to any aspiring nurse. Through their dedication, excellence and strength of spirit, these trailblazing African-American women broke down racial barriers in the nursing profession and truly changed the course of history. Bonus: Mary Seacole                     Although the term “African American” doesn’t usually apply to black people born in the Americas outside of the US, no list of trailblazing black nurses would be complete without Jamaican-born Mary Seacole. With a reputation that rivals that of Florence Nightingale, Seacole certainly made history. Not only did she cope with prejudice and discrimination, but she was also a selfless nurse, dedicated to providing strong medical services to wounded soldiers. After the outbreak of the Crimean War in 1853, Seacole traveled overseas to the British War Office, determined to serve as an army nurse. Then when she was refused, she funded her own trip to Crimea, started a hotel for injured officers (built out of salvaged materials), and braved enemy fire to nurse the wounded on the battlefield. Affectionately, she was known as “Mother Seacole.” And she is still remembered in Britain, where many buildings and organizations are named in...

National Nurse Anesthetists Week: 25-31

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Fact Sheet Nurse anesthetists have been providing anesthesia care to patients in the United States for more than 150 years. The credential CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist) came into existence in 1956. CRNAs are anesthesia professionals who safely administer more than 34 million anesthetics to patients each year in the United States, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) 2013 Practice Profile Survey. CRNAs are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America, enabling healthcare facilities in these medically underserved areas to offer obstetrical, surgical, pain management and trauma stabilization services. In some states, CRNAs are the sole providers in nearly 100 percent of the rural hospitals. According to a 1999 report from the Institute of Medicine, anesthesia care is nearly 50 times safer than it was in the early 1980s. Numerous outcomes studies have demonstrated that there is no difference in the quality of care provided by CRNAs and their physician counterparts. CRNAs provide anesthesia in collaboration with surgeons, anesthesiologists, dentists, podiatrists, and other qualified healthcare professionals. When anesthesia is administered by a nurse anesthetist, it is recognized as the practice of nursing; when administered by an anesthesiologist, it is recognized as the practice of medicine. Regardless of whether their educational background is in nursing or medicine, all anesthesia professionals give anesthesia the same way. As advanced practice registered nurses, CRNAs practice with a high degree of autonomy and professional respect. They carry a heavy load of responsibility and are compensated accordingly. CRNAs practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered: traditional hospital surgical suites and obstetrical delivery rooms; critical...

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