Why does Diversity in Nursing Matter?

        Diversity in Nursing is a popular topic in the world of Nursing. But, why is diversity an issue and what can we do to make improvements? I have noticed people and some nurses; really do not understand the issue of diversity in nursing. In addition, why is diversity in nursing the elephant in the room?  There is a need to have diversity in the population of nurses because of the diverse population of patients. Let’s review the statistics and ethnicities in nursing: How do minority nurses self-identify? (Minoritynurse.com, 2016) 9.9% of RNs are Black or African American (non-Hispanic); 8.3% are Asian; 4.8% are Hispanic or Latino; 1.3% categorize themselves as two or more race; 0.4% are American Indian or Alaskan Native. Let’s review the statistics and ethnicities of the US population: What is the US population identifying? (infoplease.com/us/census.html, 2016) 12.3% are Black or African American (non-Hispanic); 3.6% are Asian; 12.4% are Hispanic or Latino; 2.4% categorize themselves as two or more race; 0.9% are American Indian or Alaskan Native. TABLE: US POPULATION VS MINORITY NURSES Ethnicities (2016) US Population Minority Nurses Minority Nurses Needed by 2020 Black or African American 9.9% 12.3% 2.4% Asian 8.3% 3.6% +4.7 % (surplus) Hispanic or Latino 4.8% 12.4% 7.6% Two or more races 1.3% 2.4% 1.1% American Indian/Alaskan 0.4% 0.9% 0.5%   The table above list the needs in the minority community related to the US population and minority nurses. There is a need for more minority nurses to equal the population of the United States. Of all the ethnicities listed the Asian minority has the surplus of nurses....

Little Unknown Black Nurse History

          In the Beginning for Black Nurses Wet Nurse is a woman who breast feeds and cares for another’s child. During slavery, African American women were forcing to function as wet nurses for their owners. Famous Educated Black Nurses Rachel Robinson is a former nurse and the widow of baseball player Jackie Robinson. She founded the Jackie Robinson Foundation. Betty Shabazz, widow of Malcom X, completed a degree in NURSING before becoming an educator. Famous Black Male Nurse or those who contributed to Blacks in Nursing James Derham born a slave, he purchased his freedom by working as a nurse & opened a medical practice. Daniel Hale Williams opened Provident Hospital and Training School for Nurses, the nation’s first hospital with a nursing and intern program. Black Nurse Organizations National Black Nurses Association – 150,000 African American nurses & students – 92 chapters (35 states). CHI ETA Phi Sorority – professional organization for RN’s & students with – 22 chapters (26 states). Black Nurses Rock-the newest & 2nd largest national black nurse organization-150,000 nurses & students. Famous Movies or TV Show focused on Black Nurses Nurse Julia – Diane Carroll as Nurse Julia 1st AA woman to earn an Emmy nomination & won 2 Golden Globes. HawthoRNe – Jada Pinkett Smith as Nurse Christina Hawthorne as CNO & President of a Hospital. She won an Image Award. The Book of Negros Movie – Aminata Diallo is forced into slavery & used Nursing midwifery skills for a living. Nurse by Association Salt & Pepper Rap Duo met – In 1985, while studying nursing at Queensborough Community College. Henrietta...

Happy Veterans Day

  “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…” –President Woodrow Wilson Nov 11 1918   I am proud to be a Veteran of The United States Army. Not many people understand the discipline and self sacrifice required to serve in the military. As an educator I often ask questions to gain a better understanding of what motivates people to think the way they do. Today I decided to ask this question of random people that I encountered while running my errands “Why is it important to celebrate Veterans day?” The responses ranged from offended looks to the standard answer of “because the people that died for our freedom deserve recognition”. As a result of this experience, something very important occurred to me; many civilians that have not served in the military have no idea about the origins of Veterans Day or why we should celebrate it. Nothing to fear, Nurse educator Nicole is here. On any given day I wear a number of hats. I am a mom, daughter, sister, Nurse, educator, entrepreneur, and an Army Veteran.  Today I’m putting on my Veteran and educator hat. Answers to commonly asked Veterans day questions are listed below. Knowing these answers will make you a more informed citizen. My hope is that...

March is National Women’s History Month

2015 National Women’s History Month Honorees Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives 2015 is the National Women’s History Project’s  35th Anniversary.  In celebration of this landmark anniversary, there were 9 women chosen as 2015 Honorees who have contributed in very special ways to our work of “writing women back into history.”  I would like to focus on one person in particular. Darlene Clark Hine (1947- ) Historian and Educator                                   Receiving the 2013 National Humanities Medal… was both a blessing and a profound moment in the history of Black Women’s History because it represented acknowledgement and appreciation of the work that I and my generation of scholars did to include the contributions that black women have made to our nation’s progress and to the global struggle against social injustice, and economic and gender inequality.  Darlene Clark Hine She is also, the author of Black Women in White: Racial Conflict and Cooperation in the Nursing Profession, 1890-1950 (Blacks in the Diaspora) Paperback – October 1, 1989 . This is the book I referenced last month  during my webinar title, African American Nurses: Past, Present & Future with Senator Rosalyn Dance. Go to www.nicolembrownrn.com for REPLAY!!! As an historian Darlene Clark Hine sought not only to explore African American history, but to expand the discipline of history itself by focusing on black women “who remained at the very bottom of the ladder in the United States.” A leading expert on the subject of race, class, and gender in American society, Hine is credited with helping to establish a doctoral field in Comparative Black History at Michigan State University. While attending Chicago’s Roosevelt University in...

10 African-American Nurses Who Changed the Course of History

In honor of Black History Month, this blog is dedicated to the review of the Top 10 African American Nurses Who Changed the Course of History. Nursing has come a long way over the years, and its evolution – at least politically – owes much to the exceptional service, advocacy and determination of African Americans in the profession. From the inspirational Harriet Tubman to the feisty Mary Eliza Mahoney, these 10 women stand as shining examples to any aspiring nurse. Through their dedication, excellence and strength of spirit, these trailblazing African-American women broke down racial barriers in the nursing profession and truly changed the course of history. Bonus: Mary Seacole                     Although the term “African American” doesn’t usually apply to black people born in the Americas outside of the US, no list of trailblazing black nurses would be complete without Jamaican-born Mary Seacole. With a reputation that rivals that of Florence Nightingale, Seacole certainly made history. Not only did she cope with prejudice and discrimination, but she was also a selfless nurse, dedicated to providing strong medical services to wounded soldiers. After the outbreak of the Crimean War in 1853, Seacole traveled overseas to the British War Office, determined to serve as an army nurse. Then when she was refused, she funded her own trip to Crimea, started a hotel for injured officers (built out of salvaged materials), and braved enemy fire to nurse the wounded on the battlefield. Affectionately, she was known as “Mother Seacole.” And she is still remembered in Britain, where many buildings and organizations are named in...

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