Nurses help with Dementia: Loss of Conceptual Willpower

Nurses and nursing students take care of patients with Dementia and Alzheimer’s everyday.  Review the chart in the picture to learn the differences between dementia and Alzheimer’s. Dementia is a decline in conceptual capacity in an individual possibly as a result of global brain trauma or some ailment that brings about memory loss. If it comes up before the age of 65 then it is termed early development dementia. The expression dementia originates from a Latin word which means insanity. It can be understood as a non-specific illness syndrome where the parts of the brain responsible for memory, verbal communication, attention and problem solving are badly damaged. Nearly six months are needed for the disease to be diagnosed and in future stages, the affected individuals might end up being at a complete loss in due course. Dementia is treatable up to a specific level but as the disease press forward the symptoms turn out to be terminal. The warning signs of the disease could be reversible and it varies according to the etiology of the disease The possibility of total liberty from the symptoms of dementia is lower than 10%. Dementia can be mixed up with the near-term syndrome, delirium in the event that thorough screening of the patient’s previous record is not carried out as the symptoms are rather comparable. Depression and psychosis can be employed for differentiating dementia and delirium. Various types of dementia are best known that differ significantly in their symptoms. The symptoms of various kinds may overlap, so medical diagnosis is performed by nuclear brain scanning approaches. Common forms of dementia include Alzheimer’s disease,...

Happy Veterans Day

  “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…” –President Woodrow Wilson Nov 11 1918   I am proud to be a Veteran of The United States Army. Not many people understand the discipline and self sacrifice required to serve in the military. As an educator I often ask questions to gain a better understanding of what motivates people to think the way they do. Today I decided to ask this question of random people that I encountered while running my errands “Why is it important to celebrate Veterans day?” The responses ranged from offended looks to the standard answer of “because the people that died for our freedom deserve recognition”. As a result of this experience, something very important occurred to me; many civilians that have not served in the military have no idea about the origins of Veterans Day or why we should celebrate it. Nothing to fear, Nurse educator Nicole is here. On any given day I wear a number of hats. I am a mom, daughter, sister, Nurse, educator, entrepreneur, and an Army Veteran.  Today I’m putting on my Veteran and educator hat. Answers to commonly asked Veterans day questions are listed below. Knowing these answers will make you a more informed citizen. My hope is that...

Nursing in an Aging American

Nursing in an Aging America For every person aged 65+ in 2000 there will be almost two by 2030.[1] That makes one in seven Americans today over the age of 65.[2] Profile: 25.1 million are women (56.2%) 19.6 million are men (43.8%) 78.8% are white 21.2% are minority And they’re active: 28% of older Americans live alone 536,000 grandparents 65+ have primary responsibility for their grandchildren (slightly more than 1 in 100 if you want to plot that way) By 2022 31.9% of the workforce will be ages 65-75[5] And America’s just getting older. The average American reaching 65 today are expected to live 19.3 years 20.5 for females 17.9 for males With the population 85+ expected to nearly triple from 2013-2040 2013: 6 million 2040: 14.6 million A majority of their medical needs will fall into the hands of nurses. Number nationwide:[4] Nursing Assistants: 1,534,400 Licensed Practical Nurses: 738,400 Registered Nurses: 2,711,500 Nurse Anesthetists/midwives/practitioners: 151,400 Active MD’s: 826,001 Can they keep pace? Increase in percentage 2012-2022: Americans 75+: 25% Americans 85+: 50% Expected change in employment: Average Growth in All Occupations: 11% Nursing Assistants: 21% Licensed Practical Nurses: 25% Registered Nurse: 19% Nurse Anesthetists/midwives/practitioners: 31% MD’s: 18% Actual Growth Rate Today: Licensed Practical Nurses: 15.5% Registered Nurses: 24.1% The Bad News: Nurses are aging too: Average age of working nurses: 50 RNs expected to retire/leave the workforce by 2022: 555,100 (one in five) Percentage of nurses under 40: 1980: 54% 1992: 44.8% 2000:31.7% 2004:26.6% 2008:29.5% Aging America needs not only more nurses, but more educated nurses.[6] 2000: 50% of the RN workforce hold a bachelors degree or higher...

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