SAVE the Date – Nursing Success EXPO – Richmond, VA

SAVE THE DATE: November 21st at Trinity Life Center, Richmond, VA from 8am-5pm. I would like to invite all nurses & future nurses to attend and be apart of the 1st annual event Nursing Success EXPO. We have almost 50 vendors with information for nurses. Sponsored by: Vibra Hospital, VA Hospital & The Nurse Dolls KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Senator Rosalyn Dance RN For RN’s & LPNs: FREE CEU’s: Non-Tradition Nursing Careers Mentorship for Nurses FREE Vickie Milazzo (Legal Nurse Guru) Books Classes on: Nurse as an Author Nurse as a Business Owner Health & Wellness for Nurses For Student & Future Nurses: FREE Nurse.com Magazine Free Minority Nurse Magazine Class on Passing TEAS TEST Class on Passing NLCEX Class on NLCEX REVIEW Session Health & Wellness for Future Nurses THE NURSE DOLLS with children’s’ books and animated DVD’s will be making their official DEBUT!! Live internet streaming all day. Live iheart Radio on campus 2-4 hours. Door prizes and much more!! TO Register: Go to: bitly.com/NursingSuccessExpo or Event Brite: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/nursing-success-college-career-education-expo-rva-tickets-17357640169?aff=eac2  Happy Nursing, Nicole M. Brown, MSN, RN Founder: Nursing Success College, LLC Founder: The Nurse Dolls, LLC Email: info@nursingsuccesscollege.com (863)...

Nurse Hero: Mary Seacole (1805-1881)

        Mary Seacole was a Jamaican-born nurse who helped soldiers during the Crimean War. She was born Mary Grant in Kingston, Jamaica, daughter of a Scottish soldier and the owner of a boarding house for officers and their families. Seacole had a good education, and developed an interest in medicine and nursing from her mother, who was a traditional healer. In 1836 she married Edwin Horatio Seacole, a naval officer, who died in 1844. Mary remained in Kingston but spent a lot of time nursing in Panama, where a Cholera Epidemic had quickly taken hold. At the start of the Crimean War in 1853, she went to London to offer her services. As was the case with many Nurses, her application to join Florence Nightingale’s nursing team was refused whether because of their class background or, in this case, probably, ethnicity. Instead of giving up, Mary Seacole sailed to the Crimea at her own expense. She and Thomas Day (a relative in the shipping business) opened the British Hotel near Balaclava a few months later in 1855. Using it as a base, she would take mules laden with food, wine and medicines across country to the battlefield front lines. She obtained special passes, which allowed her to look after the wounded and dying on both sides. In 1857 her autobiography, Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands, became a bestseller. The Seacole Fund eventually enabled her to live in comfort in Paddington, London, until her death in 1881. Clicks here: Share the gift of Nursing to your little girl!! Nicole M. Brown, RN Founder: The Nurse Dolls & Nursing Success...

October: Breast Cancer Awareness Month

A year after graduating high school I received a call from one of my very best childhood friends. The news was troubling, her mother, Catherine, had been diagnosed with late stage breast cancer. Being young and unfamiliar with the severity of the diagnosis or the disease itself, I had no idea the fight Catherine and her family would endure in the months to come. I made it a point to call once a week to check on my friend in regards to her mom’s health but she always seemed to be busy spending time with her mother. This time they spent together usually included some life task that Catherine was teaching my friend be it learning to cook for the family, grocery shop on her own, and tending to her little sisters hair. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary to me as my own mother was instilling similar responsibilities in me in preparation for college and dorm life. As a matter of fact everything in my friends life seemed perfectly normal until one afternoon 3 months later when I received a call from a cousin of my friend notifying me that Catherine had passed away. I was 18 years old. My friends parents were like my parents,invincible- right? They couldn’t possibly die while we still needed them so. I  rushed over to my friends house where the family was gathered and ran straight to her bedroom. She was laying on her bed staring at the ceiling. I said nothing, climbed in bed with her, held her hand, and joined her gaze toward Heaven, her mothers untimely resting place. About...

Pioneers in Nursing: Hazel Winifred Johnson-Brown (October 10, 1927 – August 5, 2011)

Hazel Johnson was born in 1927 in West Chester, Pennsylvania. She was one of seven children. She grew up on her father’s farm in Chester County, near the town of Malvern. When she was twelve, she was inspired to become a nurse by a local white public health nurse. When Hazel W. Johnson-Brown tried to gain admission to a local hospital, she was told, “We’ve never had a black person in our program, and we never will.” Fortunately, despite the racial obstacles in her path, Johnson-Brown persevered and did become a nurse. She studied at the Harlem Hospital School of Nursing, where she graduated in 1950. She then joined the army, working in Japan and later Korea during her service. In the 1960s, she also trained Vietnam-bound surgical nurses. Johnson-Brown’s abilities in the operating theater led to her climbing the ranks in the army. She eventually became the first black woman to be promoted to Brigadier General and the first to head the 7,000-strong US Army Nurse Corps. As well as her Harlem diploma, Johnson-Brown achieved a nursing bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree, and an educational administration PhD. And to top it all off, she was awarded a number of distinguished military decorations in addition to being named Army Nurse of the Year twice. In addition, she was my Great Aunt and always promoted nursing whereever she went!! I met her several times. There is information about her at the United States Army Women’s Museum located on Fort Lee, V. A. Always remember  our Nursing Heroes!! Introduce Nursing to children to prepare our next generation of Nursing Heroes!! Nicole M. Brown, RN...

Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental Illness Awareness Week takes place every year during the first full week of October. During this week, mental health advocates and organizations across the U.S. join together to sponsor a variety of events to promote community outreach and public education concerning mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Examples of activities held during the week include art/music events, educational sessions provided by healthcare professionals, advertising campaigns, health fairs, movie nights, candlelight vigils, and benefit runs. Mental illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. Just as diabetes is a disorder of the pancreas, mental illnesses are medical conditions that often result in a diminished capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life. An estimated one in four adults – suffer from a diagnosable mental illness in any given year. However, the stigma surrounding mental illness is a major barrier that prevents people from seeking the mental health treatment that they need. Programs during Mental Illness Awareness Week are designed to create community awareness and discussion in an effort to put an end to stigma and advocate for treatment and recovery.  A few important facts surrounding Mental illness: With appropriate medication and a wide range of services tailored to their needs, most people who live with serious mental illnesses can significantly reduce the impact of their illness and find a satisfying measure independence. A key concept is the development of strategies to manage the illness process. Early identification and treatment is of vital importance; By ensuring access to the treatment and recovery supports that are...

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