Are Monster and Zombie Toys appropriate for Children?

As the leaves begin to fall and the temperature outside becomes cooler, it is apparent that Fall is upon us. In recent discussions with my friends, I have come to realize that people love and look forward to this season for varied reasons. I love the renewing of the land. Fall serves as a constant reminder that with every season comes a rebirth; a renewing of the mind and spirit. Issue #1: One thing I never got used to was the connotation of Fall with Halloween and everything spooky. As I travel in and out of popular department stores, I see depictions of Halloween and a rise in monster, vampire, and spooky dolls. Though my family and I do not partake in the custom of Halloween, I do not judge families that do. I do however, deem it important to discuss the negative effects that monster & zombie dolls may have on our children who see the world in much different ways than we do as adults. A child’s imagination is colorful and inventive. If positive influences are fed to a child then the outcome of their imaginative play is usually positive as well. Issue #2: If influences such as toys depicting monsters and vampires are introduced to a child, the imaginative play changes to attributes befitting of monsters and vampires. The way children pretend play carries over into their interaction with peers. If they are playing with vampires some things incorporated in the play are biting, the undead, preying and feeding on the living and sexually alluring looks and actions. Not only are these dolls and figures unrealistic they...

Breaking the Chain of Infection

With Fall fast approaching and school back in session, I feel it necessary to discuss the eminent cold and flu season sure to effect 1 out of 4 households in America. I was recently made aware of an incident regarding a birthday sleepover a friend hosted for her 11-year-old daughter, at which my daughter attended. The mother of one of the little girls invited gave permission for her daughter to attend but warned that her daughter had a rather violent cough due to allergies and the changing of pollen in the air. The mother promised that this cough was not a cold or infectious condition and that no other child attending the sleepover would be affected, as allergies are, for the most part, non-communicable. When the child arrived at my friend’s house, she announced that she needed her Robitussin dose every 4-6 hours. The person with limited medicinal knowledge knows that Robitussin is a cough suppressant used for those with cold symptoms. My friend was caught between sending the sick child home disappointed and embarrassed or treating the child with her cold medicine and praying that no one else would become exposed. My friend opted for the latter. She gave the ill child her doses of cold medicine, made her wash her hands before every activity, and isolated her to her own sleeping bag for the wellness of the other guests. Unfortunately, none of these preventative measures was enough to keep four out of the seven girls in attendance from becoming ill 2 days later- my daughter included! Rather than blame the parent that allowed her daughter’s cold to spread...

Support Women & Veteran Owned Businesses

        “The way to achieve your own success is to be willing to help somebody else get it first.” — Iyanla Vanzant, Speaker This quote speaks volumes to me as a female entrepreneur. I have taken many paths in my life to get me to this point. The best decision I have ever made was to become a nurse then a Nurse Educator.  I started Nursing Success College to educate those interested in pursuing a career in Nursing. As I found nursing to be my calling, helping others find fulfillment in the field nursing is my mission. Entrepreneurship is not an easy dream to achieve. Resources are difficult to come by and getting the word out about the endeavor can be a hit or miss task. I’ve heard it said before that you will never find harder work than working for yourself and it rings true. The rewards far outweigh the sleepless nights and rejection. Truth is- as a female business owner, rejection can become commonplace in a society that tends to bend more toward the business savvy of men. The going sentiment many times is that a man can do the job right! While there are plenty of successful male business owners, women in entrepreneurship are an equal force to be reckoned with.  Some things to contend with as a women veteran business owner are: Initial funding Balancing work/home life Respect from the business community Business Mentorship and training opportunities Consumer Support The Federal Government has established grant programs for Women & Veterans for Small Businesses in an effort to close the wide gap and disparity between...

Who Takes Care of NURSES?

In grade school children are encouraged to bring an apple for their teacher as a way of saying Thank you. In Corporate America birthdays, anniversaries, and the welcoming of a new bundle of joy to an employee’s family warrant some form of celebration and gifts. Showing Thanks and celebrating one another become part of our societal norm and cultural mannerisms very early on in life. When we are treated at a medical facility, whether pre scheduled appointment or emergency, we are usually self-focused. A myriad of emotions may befall the average patient, “Is everything alright with my health”? “How much will this visit cost me?” “Is this procedure going to hurt”? What we rarely notice is the Nurse taking our vitals, gathering information, concerning over the smallest detail of our health and in the fight with us. Who cares for the one caring for all? Many Nurses cite stress and fatigue as the leading cause of burn out in the field. Multi-tasking to ensure that every patient receives the best level of care while working long arduous rotating shifts, is not for the weak. Thank God, there are Nurses and Healthcare Professionals that care for us physically and emotionally when our bodies cannot or will not care for itself. There are many ways to show appreciation for our Nurses. A little known secret; many Nurses are trinket and toy people who become excited by representations of their field. The Nurse Dolls, books and DVD make a great Christmas, Birthday, Graduation, Nurses Week, and “thinking of you” gifts! If the Nurse in your life ever uses a pen, haha, we have...

September: National Sickle Cell Awareness Month

                                                                      What do Larenz Tate, Tiki Barber, Miles Davis, Paul Williams, Tionne ‘T- Boz’ Watkins, rapper Prodigy and Junior from the Steve Harvey Morning Show have in common? Aside from being well known African American celebrities, they also share the debilitating disease Sickle Cell Anemia. The term Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) refers to a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. People with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) have abnormal hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S or sickle hemoglobin, in their red blood cells. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. SCD is passed by genes from parents to their children. In the United States, with an estimated population of over 270 million, about 1,000 babies are born with Sickle Cell Disease each year. People who have SCD inherit two abnormal hemoglobin genes, one from each parent. There are many different forms of  SCD however, in all forms at least one of the two abnormal genes causes a person’s body to make hemoglobin S. When a person has two hemoglobin S genes, Hemoglobin SS, the disease is referred to as Sickle Cell Anemia. This is the most common and often considered the most severe kind of SCD. Sickle Cell is a life long illness. The lack of tissue oxygen can cause attacks of sudden, severe pain, called pain Crises. These pain attacks can occur without warning and a person often needs to go to the hospital for effective treatment. There are effective treatments that can reduce symptoms and prolong life. The current life expectancy for a person with SCD is 40-60 years; In 1973 it was only 14 years. Early diagnosis through blood...

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