Free – African American Nurses Live Event

Let’s celebrate Black History Month. Join me, Author Nurse Nicole M. Brown as I spotlight African American Nurses: Past, Present and Future featuring Senator Rosalyn R. Dance! This webinar is right for you if: You are a Future Nurse You are a Student Nurse You are a Professional Nurse You want information on Past AA Nurses You want information on Present AA Nurses You want information on Future AA Nurses You are interested in African American History REGISTER TODAY: www.nicolembrownrn.com Connect on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1563806700533233/ Sponsored by Nicole M. Brown, MSN, RN, who is a nurse educator. Founder of Nurse Nicole Enterprises, Nursing Success College & Nurses are Blessed.org Educating the World through the Art & Science of...

10 African-American Nurses Who Changed the Course of History

In honor of Black History Month, this blog is dedicated to the review of the Top 10 African American Nurses Who Changed the Course of History. Nursing has come a long way over the years, and its evolution – at least politically – owes much to the exceptional service, advocacy and determination of African Americans in the profession. From the inspirational Harriet Tubman to the feisty Mary Eliza Mahoney, these 10 women stand as shining examples to any aspiring nurse. Through their dedication, excellence and strength of spirit, these trailblazing African-American women broke down racial barriers in the nursing profession and truly changed the course of history. Bonus: Mary Seacole                     Although the term “African American” doesn’t usually apply to black people born in the Americas outside of the US, no list of trailblazing black nurses would be complete without Jamaican-born Mary Seacole. With a reputation that rivals that of Florence Nightingale, Seacole certainly made history. Not only did she cope with prejudice and discrimination, but she was also a selfless nurse, dedicated to providing strong medical services to wounded soldiers. After the outbreak of the Crimean War in 1853, Seacole traveled overseas to the British War Office, determined to serve as an army nurse. Then when she was refused, she funded her own trip to Crimea, started a hotel for injured officers (built out of salvaged materials), and braved enemy fire to nurse the wounded on the battlefield. Affectionately, she was known as “Mother Seacole.” And she is still remembered in Britain, where many buildings and organizations are named in...

10 Ways to Go Red This February

Go Red For Women wants to remind you of some easy ways you can Go Red this year. What does it mean to Go Red? It means supporting women just like you as we break the barriers against heart disease and stroke. Show your support for women to increase funding, education and awareness with these ideas: 10 Ways to Go Red 1. Know Your Heart Score Learn why it’s important to know your heart score on Go Red. Think you are eating right and getting enough exercise? It takes five minutes to make sure. Take the My Life Check and find out where you stand. You can also take the Go Red Heart CheckUp to get more tailored advice and information to improve your heart health. 2. Live Healthy Learn new ways to prevent heart disease with heart-healthy recipes, exercises and more on Go Red For Women. Our team of cardiologists, medical and fitness experts and nutritionists offer their advice to women like you for living a healthy lifestyle. 3. Know the Signs of a Heart Attack Watch Go Red For Women’s “Just a Little Heart Attack” video, starring and directed by Elizabeth Banks, to learn how to identify a heart attack. Learn more about the symptoms of a heart attack and stroke on Go Red. 4. Start Walking Get moving and start walking by starting or joining a walking club with friends or coworkers with the help of the American Heart Association. Sign up, get resources and even coordinate your group online! 5. Wear Red Brighten your wardrobe and support women fighting heart disease by wearing red and...

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