50 Reasons for Nurses to be Thankful

50 Reasons for Nurses to be Thankful Thankful Nurses Thanksgiving is a time for reflection, and nurses can look beyond their own families for things to be grateful for. No matter how you feel about your job or what your career has been like, you can always find something redeeming about nursing. Here are fifty reasons for you to give thanks this holiday season. Sometimes it is difficult to be thankful in a profession so challenging and all-consuming, but as you can see, you have many reasons to be thankful for your job, despite those challenges. You care for people from birth to death in so many often traumatic circumstances. Yet, you do it with grace. You are very fortunate to be part of a career field with so many options. Many jobs do not have the flexibility or choices that you have and that is probably one of the best perks of your job. Feel free to add your own to the list. I only went as far as fifty, but I could have come up with fifty more. I’m interested in what other nurses are grateful for! Lets see how many more we can come up with! 1.You get to make a difference in other people’s lives. 2.You get to wear scrubs, or what amounts to pajamas, to work. 3.You know how to talk to doctors and make them listen. 4.You cherish the time you get to spend with your family because you know life is precious. 5.Your holidays off are the best times of the year, even if you know you have to work the next one....

November is National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s 1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life One of the most common signs of Alzheimer’s is memory loss, especially forgetting recently learned information. Others include forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; increasingly needing to rely on memory aids (e.g., reminder notes or electronic devices) or family members for things they used to handle on their own. What’s a typical age-related change? Sometimes forgetting names or appointments, but remembering them later. 2. Challenges in planning or solving problems Some people may experience changes in their ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers. They may have trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. They may have difficulty concentrating and take much longer to do things than they did before. What’s a typical age-related change? Making occasional errors when balancing a checkbook. 3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure People with Alzheimer’s often find it hard to complete daily tasks. Sometimes, people may have trouble driving to a familiar location, managing a budget at work or remembering the rules of a favorite game. What’s a typical age-related change? Occasionally needing help to use the settings on a microwave or to record a television show. 4. Confusion with time or place People with Alzheimer’s can lose track of dates, seasons and the passage of time. They may have trouble understanding something if it is not happening immediately. Sometimes they may forget where they are or how they got there. What’s a typical age-related change? Getting confused...

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. If it’s not controlled, diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems. One in 12 Americans has diabetes – that’s more than 25 million people. And another 79 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news? People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, increasing physical activity, and losing weight. How can American Diabetes Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. Here are just a few ideas: Encourage people to make small changes, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Talk to people in your community about getting regular checkups. They can get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, and ask the doctor about their diabetes risk. Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. How can I help spread the word? -Share this post!! Share this: Facebook3 Twitter1 Pinterest Google...

How to Teach Young Children About Nursing

Nurse Nicole visits Stuffy Bear Factory at Chesterfield Town Center, VA Goal: Explore fun and creative methods to teach young children about the profession of nursing. Objectives: 1. Develop products to introduce nursing as a future career choice to young children. 2. Display products to introduce nursing as a future career option for young children. Nurse product line: The nursing shortage has drawn attention to the need to encourage young children to choose nursing as a future career goal. The Adventures of Nurse Nicole is designed to help young children become aware of nursing. Helps children develop skills that are needed to become a nurse. The products will focus on the current realities related to what nurses do in the nursing profession. The tools developed are age-specific such as books titled, “N is for Nurse & Wash Your Hands.” In addition, another tool is an age-specific animated DVD titled, “Battle of the Germs.” Other items available are bears and t-shirts for children. The information reviewed in the books and DVD was used by a nurse to create teaching materials for children. Free nursing gifts are available on site when Nurse Nicole visits Stuffy Bear factory at Chesterfield Town Center, VA or visit the website http://www.nursenciole.co Happy Holiday Season, Nicole M. Brown, RN aka Nurse Nicole Share this: Facebook8 Twitter5 Pinterest Google...

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