What is Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer’s disease is a neurological disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline. A neurodegenerative type of dementia, the disease starts mild and gets progressively worse. What Causes Alzheimer’s? Like all types of dementia, Alzheimer’s is caused by brain cell death.It is a neurodegenerative disease, which means there is progressive brain cell death that happens over a course of time. The total brain size shrinks with Alzheimer’s – the tissue has progressively fewer nerve cells and connections. How Common is Alzheimer’s Disease? In 2010, some 4.7 million people of 65 years of age and older were living with Alzheimer’s disease in the US. The 2013 statistical report from the Alzheimer’s Association gives a proportion of the population affected – just over a tenth of people in the over-65 age group have the disease in the US. In the over-85s, the proportion goes up to about a third. Risk Factors:       Age       Family History       Having a certain gene       (E or APOE)       Being Female (more females than males) Types of Alzheimer’s:       Dementia       Vascular Dementia       Metastatic  ...

Do Not Feed the Diabetic: Responding to Holiday Food Offers

We would be grieved to wear a placard or sign that read: I am a diabetic. Do not feed me. Children with Type 1 diabetes would be mortified to wear that sign. Yet, we would be devastated if some “kindly” person with good intentions offered your child something that could harm their health. To be preventative, learn some polite yet firm responses to inevitable food offers. Scenario 1: Your child’s best friend’s mother wants to give her/him cookies as a snack and you’re not there. This is simple enough. Once you give permission for the play date, have a private conversation with the other parent and share that your child is Type 1 diabetic and cannot have certain foods. To be polite, share that you don’t want it to be personal, because it is not; it is a matter of your child’s health interests. Offer to send snacks that are acceptable. Scenario 2: Aunt Louise tries to give your child a sugary snack against your protests. Thank Aunt Louise in front of your child and tell her that you’ll have to pass this time. Privately, as to embarrass your child or Aunt Louise, tell her that in the future she’s to ask you first and in private. Explain that your child’s health interests are a priority to you, and thank her once again before closing the subject. Scenario 3: The holiday party at school that has tons of tempting treats. Begin with a conversation with your child, reminding him or her that eating sugary sweets can make them hospital-stay sick, and you want him/her to be healthy and at...

Healthy Snacks for Diabetic Kids

Diabetic Lifestyle has an exhaustive and organized list of healthy snacks for diabetic kids. Below is a list of some of those snacks. There is diversity in the offerings that should keep your child from becoming bored with snacks to the point of cheating. From the bread group: Air-popped popcorn Graham crackers Pretzels Vanilla wafers From the dairy foods group: Frozen, low-fat, no sugar added yogurt or ice cream Fruit smoothies (made with non-fat yogurt, fruit, skim milk, and ice cubes) String cheese From the fruits and vegetables groups: Apple wedges Cherry tomatoes Cucumber slices Celery sticks stuffed with low-fat cream cheese or peanut butter Whole food snacks are the best for children, but we know that they are not always satisfactory to a child’s taste buds. You can read the extended list HERE and you can visit this really cool Pinterest board filled with snack suggestions and recipes. Do you have some of your own? Please share in the comment...

Exercise and Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Contrary to popular belief, not all children with Type 1 (Juvenile) diabetes are inactive and obese. Some are quite active, which is wonderful. Still, we should be concerned about children with the disease who lead a sedentary lifestyle as well as learn a few facts for those who are active. According to Web MD children who take insulin are at risk of hypoglycemia during and after exercise. It is recommended that blood sugar levels be checked before, during and after exercise. Do not let your child exercise if blood sugar is over 250 mg/dL or ketones are present. Make sure your child’s blood sugar is in the target range before exercise-to avoid low blood sugar. Make sure your child wears identification. Inject the insulin before exercise in a site other than the parts of the body your child will be using during exercise. For example, if your child will be running, do not inject insulin in the leg. Your child may eat 15 to 30 grams of quick-sugar food (hard candy, fruit juice, honey) 15 to 30 minutes before exercise. If your child plays in organized sports, give the coach a list of the symptoms of low blood sugar and instructions about what to do if it occurs. Have some quick-sugar food (hard candy, fruit juice, honey) on hand at all times. You can also make sure your child’s coach carries quick-sugar foods. You should read the entire list of facts and how-tos in the article Type 1 Diabetes in Children: Safe Exercise and most important, check with your child’s physician before doing...

Pin It on Pinterest