5 Great Facts about Obesity from the World Health Organization’s Fact File

The World Health Organization (WHO) has an amazing fact file with 10 facts everyone should know about obesity, which is at epidemic level in the United States. There are five facts below and this is a great time to read them as we put away body-conscious clothing and prepare to nest for the winter. Fact 1 Overweight and obesity are defined as “abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health” Fact 2 More than 1.4 billion adults were overweight in 2008, and more than half a billion obese Fact 3 Globally, over 40 million preschool children were overweight in 2008 Fact 4 Overweight and obesity are linked to more deaths worldwide than underweight Fact 5 For an individual, obesity is usually the result of an imbalance between calories consumed and calories expended Visit WHO’s Fact File on Obesity  to read the rest of the facts. Without question obesity is a problem and the more we know the better we can do to combat it....

What is Breast Cancer? What Causes It?

Breast cancer starts in the cells of the breast as a group of cancer cells. Those cells can invade surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to other areas of the body. Breast cancer occurs when malignant tumors develop in the breast.  These cells can spread by breaking away from the original tumor and entering blood vessels or lymph vessels, which branch into tissues throughout the body. When cancer cells travel to other parts of the body and begin damaging other tissues and organs, the process is called metastasis. Facts about Breast Cancer in the United States One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death among women. Each year it is estimated that over 220,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will die. Although breast cancer in men is rare, an estimated 2,150 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and approximately 410 will die each year.  Usually detected as a hard lump under the nipple or areola. Risk Factors Age Family History Race Personal Health Early Menstruation Types of Tumors Benign Malignant...

7 Important Facts about Breast Cancer Awareness for African American Women

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and this is a great time to become better informed about breast cancer and black women. Below you will find several facts that you are welcome to share but most importantly keep close to your vest as you become more aware about your own health care. Black women are less likely than white women to get breast cancer, yet have a higher breast cancer death rate. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Black women and in 2010, the CDC reported that breast cancer was the leading cause of cancer death for Black women aged 45–64 years. The breast cancer death rate for women aged 45–64 years was 60% higher for Black women than white women. Younger Black women up to age 44 have a higher incidence of breast cancer than white women. Black women are two times more likely to develop triple negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease which has fewer effective treatment options. We also are known to have denser breast, one of the strongest predictors of risk for breast cancer and also is a known factor limiting the sensitivity of a screening mammogram. For Black women who have been diagnosed at the earliest stage of breast cancer when the tumor is small and localized, early diagnosis can make a difference. All of the above facts were pulled from a great, lengthy article, Surviving Breast Cancer through Early Detection and Diagnosis, by the Black Women’s Health Imperative that is based on a CDC report you can access...

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